Collaboration network from 2010 to 2019

 

 

I’ve been trying to wrap my head around working with temporal networks — not just simple edge activation that changes over time but also evolving node attributes and nodes that may appear and disappear at random. What better way than to work with a small concrete example I’m already very familiar with?

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Quick look at NIH K-award funding

Motivated by a chat with Maria Glymour, I took a quick look at NIH K-award funding rates. It’s a very exploratory/descriptive look, but all the code is up on my GitHub. I’m hoping to find time to dive into the data more at some point.

Just putting it here, with no commentary, in case others who are applying for K’s might find it useful.

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My Collaboration Network

My Twitter timeline is blowing up with #NetSci2018 tweets and awesome visualizations this week, so I was inspired to see if I can quickly make my own “gratuitous collaboration graph” (as Dan would say).

Hover over each node to see the name of the paper (red), co-author (blue), or other project (green for data and orange for software).

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Looking at opioid-related mortality, by race, 1979 to 2016

Our paper (with Monica Alexander and Magali Barbieri) is out now (in published ahead-of-print form). Monica has a great, short Twitter thread on the findings so if you don’t want to read the whole thing, check that out. The publisher’s PDF is here.

After submitting our paper, the NCHS released the 2016 multiple cause of death files — so a couple months ago we were curious to see how (or if) our results would change when adding the 2016 data.

[NOTE (2/25/2019): Since this post, the 2017 data have also been released. I did a similar analysis comparing our original paper with the additional two years of data. See this post here or our Github repo.]

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tldr; San Diego weather is better than Boston weather

I am taking a break from a crazy couple months of writing and coding by… writing code. Just a quick post comparing weather in Boston (where I am) to weather in San Diego (where I’m from).

While the New York Times may have made the original, most data viz people will recognize the plot above from Tufte’s classic, Visual Display of Quantitative Information. It presents a ton of data in a clear, concise, and appealing way. The background bars show the record high and low daily temperature, the mid-ground bars show the “normal” (though as far as I can tell, normal is never clearly defined) high and low temperature, and the foreground shows the high and low for that year. In addition, we have annotations for days that met or made the record. The original plot even had a subplot for daily precipitation.

Here is a similar plot for Boston:

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Replacing decimal points with interpuncts in MS Word

It turns out Microsoft Word’s “Advanced Find and Replace” is quite… well, advanced. You can actually use regex to do relatively complex find and replace functions. For example, The Lancet requires that all decimal points be middle dots (i.e., interpuncts). This is pretty trivial in LaTeX or Rmd and turns out it’s equally easy in Word.

Just use ([0-9]{1})(\.)([0-9]{1}) as your search query and \1·\3 as your replacement with the “Use wildcards” option.

We (as a field) should still be moving over to doing our drafting in Rmd or LaTeX though. The bloat on MS Word makes working with moderate sized manuscripts with figures painful.

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Using R, Wikipedia, and SHERPA/RoMEO to show New England Journal of Medicine’s pre-print statement is empirically false.

One of the most fundamental aspects of collaborative research is sharing your work with others through pre-print or conference presentations. This isn’t likely to be news to anybody doing collaborative research these days, and many journals have become increasingly permissive with their pre-print policy. For example, Nature released an editorial making it clear, “Nature never wishes to stand in the way of communication between researchers.[…] Communication between researchers includes not only conferences but also preprint servers. The ArXiv preprint server is the medium of choice for (mainly) physicists and astronomers who wish to share drafts of their papers with their colleagues, and with anyone else with sufficient time and knowledge to navigate it. […] If scientists wish to display drafts of their research papers on an established preprint server before or during submission to Nature or any Nature journal, that’s fine by us.”1 Other prestigious journals have similar policies—for example, The Lancet, Science, PNAS, and BMJ. (The list goes on and on.)

One such journal does not. New England Journal of Medicine (Figure 1).

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Using a histogram as a legend in choropleths

Despite well known drawbacks,1 plotting parameters onto maps provides a convenient way of seeing context, patterns, and outliers. However, one of the many problems with choropleths is that the area of the regions tend to distort our perception of the value of the region. For example, in the United States, huge (in terms of land mass) counties will tend to have a greater visual impact than small counties (despite often having similar or even smaller population sizes).

One way to address this is to use a histogram as a legend on your map. The histogram then provides you with a way of showing raw counts of equal weights while the map allows you to provide the spatial context of the values.

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Show 1 footnote

  1. E.g., Gelman and Price 1999 or How to Lie with Maps by Mark Monmonier

Getting SSL certificates on GoDaddy Shared Hosting plans

Since Google’s announcement that they will start publicly shaming unsecured websites in January 2017, everybody has been rushing to try to get their https tags. I’ve also been getting relentless phone calls from GoDaddy salespeople asking me to buy SSL certificates for about $5 per month. I’m stereotypically Asian so $5 per month on a personal blog just seems excessive. I’m not here trying to sell things or get your credit card information — SSL is a nice-to-have-but-not-$5-per-month-nice-to-have item.

Turns out, creating and making free SSL certificates is not that hard thanks to the good people at EFF. There’s a very helpful blog post by Isabel Castillo that outlines how to do it. Some issues I ran into and their solutions:

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